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Music: The Key to Advanced Childhood and Adolescence

Posted
Mon, 04/20/2020 - 2:58pm
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3 weeks ago
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For eons, it has been said that children are the key to the future. But what can we do as adults to ensure that the children in our lives are able to seize their destinies? For one, musical activity for children may be the key to their advanced development. 

Musical activity includes a broad array of musical engagement – including singing, playing an instrument, experimenting with vocal sounds, active and passive listening, and dancing or tapping along to the music. 

The logic is simple: advance the child and you will have advanced the future. Here we will explore how musical activity can advance childhood development.

A Means to an End

Music is a catalyst for wide-ranging child development, enabling children to creatively engage with many complex social contexts. Ignorant to the diverse complexities of childhood learning and communication difficulties, the one-size-fits-all approach to childhood education can often leave a child feeling listless and left behind. Musical activity can reverse these obstacles by unraveling a child’s hidden creative potential and keep them interested in the tasks at hand. Additionally, having an outlet through which a child can feel purposeful will help them focus on other aspects of life expected of them – increasing effective productivity. 

An End Itself

Music is a world unlike any other; it increases happiness and deepens our understanding of the world around us. Children who engage in musical activity show an increase in their overall confidence and personal fulfillment, opening a new world of possibilities regarding self-discovery and expression. Music is thus an inherent tool for personal growth outside of its latent abilities to improve various aspects of childhood development and should be considered an end itself.

Musical Families Rock

Parents and children who share the gift of music together are more likely to strengthen their bonds as a family, and this can prove beneficial to both child and adult alike. Not only does shared musical engagement provide the child with a sense of joy and meaning, but it also allows the parent or guardian to tap into their own creativity. The subsequent relationship, therefore, may prove useful in establishing deeper connections and cultivating a space for openness, fun, and creativity.

Personal Problem Solving

Learning music can help a child overcome or navigate the personal hardships inherent to childhood as they inevitably arise. A kid with ADHD, for example, could greatly benefit from the discipline of sticking with an instrument because it both requires them to focus on the task at hand and offers endless creative reward which incentivizes active learning. Additionally, listening to and learning music can help alleviate stress and anxiety, and children are no less prone to these issues than adults. Music can, therefore, lay the groundwork for future methods of problem-solving which can prove invaluable to the growth of children.

Seeds of Success

Learning music can unlock a child’s creative potential. This creative potential has many benefits that may plant the seeds of success in various, less obvious aspects. Children who can think outside of the box and who show the kind of determination involved in learning an instrument certainly show much promise. Creative problem solving proves valuable to the workplace and interpersonal relationships throughout the child’s life, making music beneficial to the advanced development of a successful child.

Outro

Childhood musical development is ripe with possibilities and should be considered integral to the advancement of children everywhere. If you teach children in any capacity, do us all a favor and support them playing music.

Rebecca is a seasoned blogger and regularly writes about music and music-related themes. She is fascinated with finding better ways to improve the way music is taught to and learned by children. Rebecca...