3 Strategies on how to help your child deal with bullies

Posted
Thu, 09/21/2017 - 9:41am
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1 month ago
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October is Bullying Prevention Month

Nearly 49% of children in grades 4 – 12, according to StopBullying.gov reported having been bullied recently within the past month alone. As the numbers of cases begin to soar, only a few cases are ever reported to the local authorities. Bullying usually takes place in school, outside school grounds, and even the on the bus. It also happens online through cyberbullying wherever kids gather.

But did you know that only 25% of students who experience being bullied notify an adult, yet alone their parents? The statistics of bullying is high while the results of informing are at an all-time low. In this guide, we will discuss how you can help your child and instill proper guidance during such problems.

Here are 3 strategies on how to help your child deal with bullies.

Provide Strong Support for Your Child

Bullies strive to make their victims feel powerless and alone. The most effective way children and reclaim their power is to maintain connections with their friends and supportive adults around them.

Build Awareness

Kids often feel like adults never do anything to help them. While there are cases where adults fail to acknowledge the situation, it is often due to the adults not paying attention to what is going on. Talk to your child and discuss the situation. Be clear in teaching them that telling on bullies does not make them a coward, but a powerful move to regain their power.

Act Fast

The longer the bully assaults the victim, the stronger their hold becomes. In most cases, bullies start out in a mild form such as name-calling, teasing, and slight physical aggression. Bullies often test the waters before they continue to progress their aggression once they’re convinced that the victim was too afraid to tell an adult.

It is important to take bullying seriously and assume that “kids will be kids.” Bullying can range from hitting to name-calling and mocking to extorting money. The effects can play a serious role in the child’s sense of self-worth and safety. In many cases, bullying has also led to preventative tragedies such as school shootings and suicides.

What’s important is that you must teach your child ways on how to act in these situations and that non-verbal actions such as looking away, shrinking back, or raising their voice will allow the bully to continue their behavior. 

Author

Now working as a writer, Jackie started her career as an English teacher , but after becoming a mom, refocused and decided to spend more time with her family. When she's not writing, she volunteers for a...

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